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20100901
20100930
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CSPAN 27
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English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
this -- a volunteer in virginia, housing back in 2009, between the republican and the voting booth, that will be the case this november. the most dangerous place to be is to be between of republican and the voting booth. we're energize. be there in big numbers to put a check. president obama and this administration and make changes to the policy read congress. >> what you think a range of the possibility? >> i think we will get six- eight, but election day, who knows what is one happened at the end of the day? >> you are skeptical of the i did the republicans will take the senate. >> i do not rule it out. i think that this is an environment -- there is no such thing as a safe democratic seats. i think you're seeing there right now in west virginia among other places. maybe even new york. there is a lot going on on the ground were would not be surprised to see republicans take control of the senate. >> were the ones that looked out of the reach that you could imagine coming in? >> i started -- i believe that we will hold all of our opens. we're going to pick up a number of democrati
elections. >> the second congressional district in virginia is in the far southeast corner of the state. it takes in virginia beach, the largest city in virginia and parts of hampton and an area known as the eastern shore which is a couple of rural counties. it is primarily farming and touring -- farming and tourism areas. the dominant industries are the united states navy and tourism. the oceanfront, there's a vibrant tourism community with hotels. it is not as large as myrtle beach, but it is that type of community. the u.s. navy and related military enterprises is its largest business, i would say. this particular congressional race is of high interest to republicans and democrats. during his first campaign, the republicans tried to keep him in office and were not successful. since his election, he has been subject to a steady stream of bloggers and e-mail's aimed at reaching out to the media blasting all lost everything he does. because he is a freshman, legislative experts will tell you the best of times to unseat an incumbent is during the first term because they have not quite es
, the previous generation. host: nelson from west virginia. if you are from generation x, or generation y, we want to hear from you, since you will be in europe in the world -- you will be inheriting the world from the baby boom generation. and those folks that came out of the world war ii years, if you would like to talk about the baby boomers and what you left them, that would be an interesting conversation as well. the next call is from wisconsin, ron on the democrats line. ron, what generation are you in? caller: high may boomer -- i'm a boomer, born in 1947 and i think the article is way off balance. i think the contribution of the boomers goes beyond any of the other generations in the fact that people nowadays can actually say no, instead of just marching in lockstep with what happened up until the 1960's. we could say, hey, wait a second, something is wrong, and to make changes. and these changes really shaped present generations. and i think if anything, the present generation are the ones that are released boyle, undereducated, and really do not have a direction. -- are really spoil
, there will be defined benefits. you could look at north carolina and norfolk south, virginia and csx. there are many other states where we don't have progress. irnl one or both of you want to terry briefly and then get back to my main interest which is captive shipper rates >> they really get lost in all of this. one of the things troubling is the massive use of stock repurchases. i think one would have to look at a balance you say, well, people have a right to reward their share holders. they are encouraged in people to invest. along with that is the whole question of capital shipments. that's really why we are here. i would like to hear from you, a sense of your path to fairness of the captive. shippers come to see me all the time. they come from all over the koirpt country. i'm not a lawyer but i feel like one when i think of all the cases brought before the itc or stb and feeling short changed. they are always up against you can win or loose because you have a system. you sort of discuss the release in some of these papers i am reading but it is a case of timing. the classic technique is to stal
conservative district. democrats that barely one -- virginia and maryland. then you have democrats that face tougher calls. chett edwards faces a tough race. these are members represent conservative districts. this may not be the year for them to save their seats. host: what will be the game plan for the white house to save the majority in the house? guest: to be very cold-blooded in their a look and where they need to invest in these races. decide where their money can make a difference. host: will the president be campaigning for individual candidates? will he stay clear and fund- raiser for them instead? what will he do? guest: i think you'll see president obama heading up the new york checkbox pretty soon. he will head up the los angeles checkbox. -- checkbooks. many of the conservative democrats -- and democrats in conservative districts, do not want to have the present campaign for them. the individualize their races. the distance themselves from the national party. host: the first lady is going to spend some of her political capital and carefully stepped into the campaign season. wher
troops in afghanistan. virginia, the plan, democrats line. go ahead. caller: i am from new york. shall i speak up? host: go ahead. caller: i think he should turn the page. it should have been turned a long time ago. but i do not think the media will let him because they just keep the war is going. let me say this because i tried so hard to get on to you -- george washington's farewell address. he answered many of the questions facing us. telling us we should be aware -- host: sorry, we will have to let you go. your signal is breaking up. here's more from the president last night. >> we must use all elements of all power, including our diplomacy, economic strength, and the power of america as an example to secure our interests and stand by our allies. and we must reject a vision of the future that is based not just on our fearless but also on our hopes. division that recognizes the real dangers that exist around the world but also the limitless possibilities of our time. today, old adversaries are at peace and emerging democracies are potential partners. new markets for our goods stretch
into the discussion. our question is, is college overrated. the next call comes from virginia. brenda, independent line. you are on the air. i am going to move on to cape cod. bill, republican line. caller: the last two or three callers told my thunder. it could tell us about your own experience. are you a college graduate? caller: no, ma'am. but i was born at the right time. i was board in 1947 and when i got out of high school, i could go to work anywhere as far as having good benefits. the phone company, electric company, gas co., so on and so forth. but those jobs are no longer available because of productivity and technology enhancements. host: and the decline in the manufacturing base, are those kinds of companies still around? caller: i was never in the manufacturing field. i worked for the telephone company and the telephone company now has been replaced by cassell phones. the telephone jobs today are what the railroad jobs in the 1950's when the 707 came in. but that is not why i called. there is nothing wrong being a plumber, electrician, or a skilled finish carpenter. all of those peopl
. virginia, go ahead. caller: hi. i wanted to speak on nancy pelosi in support of her voice for aiding the people. one of the things that i think that has happened is the republicans have controlled the message. however, at the end of the day when it comes time for them to stand forth for the voting, people are going to find out that the republicans are selling a product without instructions. and that is going to be detrimental to them and their message that they've been continuing to churn out. it's a marketing ploy. and it's a very good one at this moment, but i think when if educated population decides to actually tune back in and say let's get on the band wagon they're going to find out that the republicans have been selling poison to the people. host: so you're saying thingless change as we get close to november caller: absolutely. i don't necessarily believe in all polls. i do watch them. but i do believe that there is an issue right now with the people that they're calling. i don't think that every person's household has been called and i think they're targeting certain areas to
were wrong in massachusetts and virginia and new jersey and delaware and alaska and kentucky. so i don't know who organizes the efforts that is needed to put obsessive partisanship aside when it gets in the way of doing what's right for the american people. and those internal power struggles that need to be set aside for the good of the order. but if i were king, more like it, if i were a coach, if i were a coach writing, i would say, look, everyone has constructive roles in this, the needs are great heading into the midterm elections because the cause is so great. the cause, the great awakening of america, and the need, truth in america, how do we get out there? how do we get the message out there to the voters? practical ways. one, we got to raise funds, got to knock on doors. we've got to hold the press accountable when you know they're making things up and telling untruths. we've got to do this together. and by the way, i am a proponent of freedom in the press in this country. our young men and women in uniform, willing to fight and die for our constitutional rights, including that
for a tuesday showdown when there will be republican opposition. west virginia, next. west virginia, next. caller: i think stephen colbert is an american and he has a right to say what he wants to say. that is how the man gets his views across. host: the fact that he is a celebrity -- caller: why shouldn't he? we say what we want to said. why can he say what he wants to say? host: people talked about his qualifications and talking about this issue. caller: that is how he gets what you want to say across. if you watch his show, which i do, him and jon stewart bring things to the forefront. they do it in a comical way. many people don't get it. we are all going to get a lot of field jaws because republicans are leading us down that path. there is such a gap between poor people and rich people is that we will need those jobs and fighting immigrants for those jobs if large class people don't wake up and vote. wake up and vote. host: new york , our republican line per caller: good morning. celebritiesk that should be in position to make comments all over the place. i believe that we are in thi
across the country. it ranges from two states, kentucky and virginia, which partly disenfranchises anyone with a felony conviction. you lose the right to vote for life in their states. you can apply for clemency and ask the governor to restore your rights. you have to go to an application procedure. it is entirely at his discretion. he decides it is to vote in his state. under some governors, that number drops precipitously. it is purely discretionary. it is entirely within the governor's control. the result is hundreds of thousands of people are disenfranchised in the states. that has a disproportionate impact on communities of color. we have been working with our partners at the naacp and the and say it -- and the aclu to change that. the results or that two states still disenfranchised anyone with a felony conviction. it will not surprise you that florida, alabama, mississippi, and arizona have permanent disenfranchisement are at least some people with criminal convictions. there has been -- i want to talk about it -- the introduction to our report. a number of these laws are firmly ro
the candidates that could possibly challenge the democratic majority. host: all right. virginia. joe, you say, no. why? caller: i am not over all happy with what is going on. the reason why i say that is we -- even with the tea party candidates, the only thing we would do is slow down the change. there has not really been any change. understand,don't that i find quite pertinent, with as much discontent as there is from voters -- voting with former democratic candidates as well as republican candidates, while a third party hasn't developed as in with what ross perot? i'm afraid the tea party candidate would do nothing more than to split the votes, we're in a general election the democrats would come back on top. host: on our 20 page -- twitter page -- that comes from helen. san diego. joanne. you say, yes, you are happy with the tea party-backed candidate. caller: i am thrilled. we have a great slate in california with carly fiorina alabama and meg whitman -- host: what she tea party? caller: i have to confess i have not gone out to one of the events, but i am thrilled that people in our country a
on to virginia. republican line. good morning. caller: yes. we have where i live at we have three pen ten sharies here and there's over a thousand inmates there. and the state -- the tax people pay i hear anywhere from $16,000 to $25,000 a year. and that's not right for us to pay that kind of money for -- to how's those inmates. host: how many jobs do you think those three produce for that area? caller: very few. host: whether or not do you say that? caller: because it's a low income county and stuff. the only thing that keeps our county going is the coal mines and stuff. host: ok. did you have more to add? caller: i would just like, like i said, $25,000 that taxpayers pay to keep the inmate in jail. and just like i said, they need to get those inmates out and bring our soldiers back home from afghanistan and train those prisoners over there for two or three weeks and send them over there. host: according to the national public radio, in 2006 the it cost about $68 billion for corrections. the average cost per state inmate was $22,000 or about $62 per day among facilities operated by the federal b
one -- virginia and maryland. then you have democrats that face tougher calls. chett edwards faces a tough race. these are members represent conservative districts. this may not be the year for them to save their seats. host: what will be the game plan for the white house to save the majority in the house? guest: to be very cold-blooded in their a look and where they need to invest in these races. decide where their money can make a difference. host: will the president be campaigning for individual candidates? will he stay clear and fund- raiser for them instead? what will he do? guest: i think you'll see president obama heading up the new york checkbox pretty soon. he will head up the los angeles checkbox. -- checkbooks. many of the conservative democrats -- and democrats in conservative districts, do not want to have the present campaign for them. the individualize their races. the distance themselves from the national party. host: the first lady is going to spend some of her political capital and carefully stepped into the campaign season. where do you expect to see her? guest:
in alexandria, virginia, and she assist him and all of his riding. he will be taken of look at the back rockledge the backdrop to the meeting, setting the stage for the -- the backdrop to the meeting, setting the stage for the young conservatives that came together. our second speaker is jim kolbe. he currently serves as a senior transatlantic fell for the german marshall fund of the united states. he is probably best known for his 22 years of distinguished service as a member of the united states house of representatives, representing a district in southern arizona centered around the city of tucson. he served proudly from 1985 until 2007, with 20 of those years on the appropriations committee. he also serves as an adjunct professor at the college of business in the university of arizona, and is a strategic consultant. jim will take a look at their remembrances of what happened on that weekend in sharon connecticut -- sharon, connecticut. our third speaker is al regnery. he is the former publisher of a publishing company which produced 22 "new york times" best sellers. he served in the
in illinois, west virginia and delaware will take office more or less immediately after votes are canvased and certified and they'll be serving in the lame-duck session. i believe that voters in those states will render a very clear judgment on this lame duck agenda by sending additional reinforcements for our side of the aisle. the campaign strategy of our friends on the other side of the aisle is crystal clear. they are not running on their legislative accomplishments because it's largely unpopular. and they are worried that voters will hold them accountable for the failure of those policies to meet their own stated goals. so they're running campaigns against the american people, some of whom are participating in the political process for the first time. and i'm talking about the tea party movement. calling some of these participants in the process guaranteed by the first amendment of the constitution to redress their government on their grievances and they're deemonizing members of the tea party -- demonizing members of the tea party movement. and president obama has engaged in class wa
in their lives. 78.4% of adults identify themselves as christian, down from 86.4% in 1990. virginia. chris, independent line. caller: thanks. i am a second time a caller. i have been listening to this program for years. hard to actually get on the air. so i am appreciative were glad to be on. anyway, as far as the core competencies, we are a large and powerful country, over 300 million people. one of the largest countries in the world in terms of population. and it is not just population. we are a very affluent country compared to other countries in the world, which is probably obvious to anyone listening. so, i think we should not just focus on having one core competence a. i kind of got in at the tail end of the discussion, but i gather we are talking about economic. but we shall not focus on any one core competency. we should focus on having that diverse economy. whether you are talking about manufacturing, services, or what ever. in some parts of the country, although some sectors in this economy are kind of doing poorly right now, other sectors are doing well. some of your localities
is something that we have to debate about, but i do not believe in sanctuaries. host: alexandria, virginia. oscar, democratic line. caller: i just came to the united states. i am a legal resident now. before people talk about the eagles not paying taxes -- talk about illegals not paying taxes , we do not steal the numbers, we just invent them. in my case i work for seven years with a fake number that they took. for seven years i have worked, i will never get the money with my three jobs and we do pay taxes. inform yourself. you will understand that most undocumented people do pay taxes. make sure that the criminals do not get any identification in your passage of this law. the people that have worked really hard to put food on the table for their families, but they wanted an opportunity. forgive them. those k -- host: ok. congressman? guest: becoming a naturalized citizen, i understand what he is saying. but what you are saying validates what i have been saying. looking as social security, the last numbers i saw were over $4 billion there, people like yourselves that i put money in and pro
is opening another restaurant in alexandria, virginia. 2 million self-employed americans will be able to receive a new deduction for health insurance. we are increasing the tax break for anyone looking to open up a business. that is a $10,000 deduction to entrepreneurs with starting costs. we need to create and are meant where folks can test new ideas and generate new business. that is not just a challenge for government. it is a challenge that requires businesses and leaders, universities, others to seek out new ways to promote entrepreneurship across the country. the second thing this bill does is we will make more loans available to small business. right now there is a waiting list for sba loans more than 1400 names long. these are people ready to hire and expand, who have been approved by their banks but who have been waiting for this legislation to pass. well, when i sign this bill, their wait will be over. their wait will be over. [applause] virtually every person on that list will receive the loan they need and a matter of weeks. several small business owners standing with me t
. this is wre democrats did well in the last two cycles. we saw this in northern virginia, suburbs outside philadelphia, outside of las vegas and phoenix, even, this is where democrats we able to win over voters with a common sense kind of agenda, practic approach to making the middle- class better. what we found is a lot of residents there are falling on tough times and switching their loyalties. they are not necessarily tea party people, so they are not angry -- i talked to about two dozen residents of the subdivision who were political independents, and they did not say anything hateful about the president or that they were voting the tea party but they were critical of the president. it's good he said they were not tea party identifiers. -- host: yu said that they are concerned about everyday issues that affect their lives. how important of the suburbs or this area of this country -- not urban america or rural america, more of a middle-class enclave. guest: it is critical for both parties. it is where the growth is. not necessarily the closed in suburbs that have been established for a
. dinwiddie, virginia. caller: i have a couple of questions. i am just amazed at the amount of money that is being spent by the republicans -- of course, the rich are behind it. the tv is full of ads and you have people out here who are well below the poverty line, and republican believe that they can save us all. save us all. the democrats do not do more to show us that we cannot go back to the old days -- $4 a gallon for gasoline. people had to do everything they could just to get back and forth from work. the republicans are spending so much money. i think we need a law that could regulate how much money can be pushed into that. guest: robert makes a profound statement, you're absolutely right. what we are seeing now, and especially because of the citizens united supreme court decision, is people are upset because of the money that is being spent. large corporations and wealthy individuals are not content with the money that they have so they are using it to deeply influenced the political process. we are talking about huge amounts of money. correct me if i am wrong, but i think w
island, did not ratify the document until after the country was established. but five states, virginia, massachusetts, new york, maryland and south carolina sent specific amendments that should be added to the document. foremost in each of those states' amendments was the concept of sovereignty or the ability of states to make the decisions. their goal and their concepts were incorporated in the 10th amendment to the constitution which put in written form the unnamed structure that the founding fathers had established in the constitution. as one of our justices on the supreme court said, the constitution protects us from our own best intentions. it divides power among branches of government precisely so we may resist the temptation to concentrate power in one location as the expedient solution to the crisis of the day. for a century and a half, this nation basically honored that concept. in the last half century, though, we have stretched the idea significantly. starting with the progressive era in the early 1900's'. it was president wilson who called this political witch craft. he sai
. parts of virginia are starting to feel -- the category two storm churned past north carolina's outer banks. officials say they'll be assessing the damages this morning. but forecasters say earl produced little storm surge and minor flooding. the jobless rate is expected to increase to .6% from 9.5%. that would be the first rise since april. bp says so far its spent $8 million responding to the oil spill cleanup. $399 million paid to settle hundreds of thousands of claims from businesses andors act affected by the 13il8. and seeing evidence that the -- today secretary gates visited troops who are in the thick of fighting in that taliban strong hold, and finally a government official says a scientist has official says a scientist has been detained in miami after screeners found a metal canister in his luggage that looked like a pipe bomb. the f.b.i. and miami-dade police are interviewing the 70-year-old man. no explosives have been found. four of miami international airports and concourses were evacuated thursday night. but the airport fully re-opened just after 4:00 a.m. this morning.
's election on "washington journal." and labor joint forces command headquartered in norfolk, virginia. goverage begins at 10 -- coverage begins at 10:00 eastern. later, ed miliband will speak at his party's conference in england. gordon brown steps down after labour lost. >> whether poking fun or dealing with more serious issues, celebrities have often spoken in congress. search for names you might know any time. >> coming up, interior secretary ken salazar talks about the recent oil spill. he testified at the national commission on the bp oil spill yesterday. this is just over an hour. very pleased to see you here this afternoon and we know you have been vigorously addressing problems of the sort we have been investigating. we have turned to the government today as the focus of our inquiry and look forward with great enthusiasm to your presentation. thank you, sir. >> thank you very much. thank you to each of the members of the commission. thank you for your service to the country and your service on this commission as we move forward to understand what caused the explosion at the de
in miami, fla., and graduated from the university of virginia and spent a brief time here in washington working for the department of justice. after graduate school i got married and my husband and dial chose to -- by husband and i chose to settle down in the same miami area where i have grown up. one afternoon i went to pick up my 3-year-old daughter, emily amar from the church preschool around the corner from the house. i buckled my son into his car seat and as i was doing this, i was ambushed from behind and hit on the head. as my daughter screen for life and thought to escape an advance, my assailant held a knife to my neck and drown out the -- entered a three-year to drown out the south of my children's cries. he said, ma'am, do you believe in god? i said, yes, and he said, good, because then you can forgive me for what i'm about to do to you and your children he then drove us out of town. he beat me, held a knife to my neck and read to me four times. each time i was violently raped, he forced both of my joy and to watch every moment of the crime. my daughter was forced to sit inch
fundraising dinner. the former chairman of virginia's democratic party writes about her this morning in "the washington post," says sarah palin saved the g.o.p. here how he concludes -- palin started as tonto, but became the lone ranger. she runs mains strong and stood by her party. she's become a bridge between the old republican guard and the growing right-wing dissatisfaction, not just about democrats, but also with republican office holders. palin's ability to advocate for using the g.o.p., not a third party to channel this angst has allowed republican voter anger to boil, yet not boil over. should republicans run up the score in november, sarah palin will deserve a lot of credit she will never get. guest: i don't know whether she'll get it, but i think that's a very accurate assessment. i think palin has been great. she's been a dynamo. she has advocated for conservative principles unapologetically. when they tried to beat her down, she bounces right back, and she's right back in her faces, and she set an example. and really, do you realize what it's like to have the entire media machin
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)